Sidechain Compression How And Why

Glenn Fricker has posted a super-useful introduction to sidechain compression, as part of his Audio Basics series:

Sidechain compression is one of those audio mixing techniques that makes a huge difference to your own recordings. As Glenn explains, it’s used to make a bit of space in your mix whenever you have two instruments competing for the same set of frequencies.

The classic use is to carve out a space for the kick drum. The kick drum is used as a trigger for a compressor on the bass guitar. The compressor reduces the volume of the bass guitar a little bit, so that the kick drum is easier to hear.

I use sidechain compression on my guitar tracks too. I like to turn down my rhythm guitars a little bit when there’s a lead guitar part or a vocal part. I find that it makes it easier to hear the lead / vocal parts, and it helps keep the overall master output volume from jumping too much during those parts.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you found Glenn’s video helpful.

3 Ways To Get Drums Without A Drumkit

Graham over at The Recording Revolution looks at how you can add drums to your recordings without having a real drummer or playing a real drum kit.

Many of us can’t play drums, and we don’t have the physical space for a drum kit of any kind either – and yet, we play music genres where drums are a major component of the overall sound.

So we need options – and Graham’s video shows 3 common options to fill in (pun intended) for a real drummer.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you found Graham’s video useful.

5 Mixing Mistakes That Are Easy To Fix

Steven Slate is back with another of his vlogs. This time, he’s taking a look at 5 ways to approach mixing.

His points really resonate with me, especially his first point on envisaging what you’re trying to achieve, and the need for a reference mix to compare against.

Oh, and he also endorses products like SonarWorks Reference 4, which I posted about earlier today.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you enjoyed Steven’s video.

Getting Better Mixes With SonarWorks Reference 4

Paul at ReaperTV has posted an interesting video on how to get better mixes in a home studio, using SonarWorks Reference 4.

Adding acoustic treatment to a home studio isn’t always easy or desirable. We don’t all have a dedicated room in the first place, and I for one like how my little space adds a bit of life to a recorded vocal.

Well, there’s another way – to change the sound coming out of your DAW to take into account the acoustic properties of your room. And this is what SonarWorks Reference 4 does.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you enjoyed Paul’s video.

Recording Drums In The Middle Of Slate HQ

For those of us recording at home, drums are a major challenge. We just don’t have the space, nor enough mics to do it justice, nor a great-sounding live room to capture it all in. It’s no surprise that drums went digital first.

So this video from Steven Slate really grabbed my attention tonight. He starts by setting up a drum kit in the middle of the office, and mics it up with only 3 mics. See what he manages to achieve from that.

This has to be one of the better showcases for modelling microphones that I’ve seen so far. I get the whole thing with them and vocals – and I have a small collection of vocal mics because there’s no such thing as one mic suits everyone – but somehow, watching Steven using different models to bring the drum recording to life really turned me on to just how much can be done with modelling today.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supporting comment if you enjoyed Steven’s video.