Solo In Any Key With One Scale Shape

Mike Geronsin of The Art of Guitar has posted a new, free lesson. Here, he’s looking at how to use the same scale shape to solo over any key – major or minor.

This is very helpful if, like me, you’re just starting out with learning how to solo or improvise over a chord progression. It’s a neat tip, that Mike clearly explains and demonstrates.

Watch the video to see how this works, then please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment.

Dialling In A Classic Marshall Amp Tone

Jeff McErlain has posted a demo of how he dials in his Marshall amp to get those classic tones.

Jeff shows us how he sets up his amp to suit his neck pickup first, with the gain set to leave plenty of room for picking dynamics. From there, he uses the tone and volume controls on his guitars to get the bridge pickup sounding great without sounding too harsh. And finally, he sticks a Klone in front of the amp as a clean boost for lead tones.

This is a fantastic video if you’re chasing these classic tones.

Watch the video for full details of how Jeff does this, and then please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment.

Jamzone Jamming App Demo

Fluff has posted a demo of a new app for jamming along to. It’s called Jamzone, and it has some really neat features.

With each song you purchase, you get a multitrack recording to jam along to. You can mute, solo, or fade any of the individual tracks – perfect for jamming along to. You also get a breakdown of the song structure, along with tempo, key, and chord information – perfect for learning a song.

Watch the video to see it in action, and – as always – please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment.

How To Solo Over Chord Changes

Paul Davids has uploaded a handy lesson video, where he’s looking at how to solo over chord changes using the pentatonic scale.

The pentatonic scale is probably the first scale we learn when we’re trying to get into writing our own solos and improvising. It’s such an easy scale to play, but making it musical over chord changes is deceptively hard.

In Paul’s lesson, he explains what the trick (sometimes) is: switch pentatonic scales when the underlying chord changes. By using the pentatonic scale that matches each chord (e.g. A minor pentatonic over an A minor chord, C major pentatonic over a C major chord), we place more of an emphasis on the musical changes that are happening in the rhythm section.

Watch the video for all the details, then please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you enjoyed Paul’s video.

Sidechain Compression How And Why

Glenn Fricker has posted a super-useful introduction to sidechain compression, as part of his Audio Basics series:

Sidechain compression is one of those audio mixing techniques that makes a huge difference to your own recordings. As Glenn explains, it’s used to make a bit of space in your mix whenever you have two instruments competing for the same set of frequencies.

The classic use is to carve out a space for the kick drum. The kick drum is used as a trigger for a compressor on the bass guitar. The compressor reduces the volume of the bass guitar a little bit, so that the kick drum is easier to hear.

I use sidechain compression on my guitar tracks too. I like to turn down my rhythm guitars a little bit when there’s a lead guitar part or a vocal part. I find that it makes it easier to hear the lead / vocal parts, and it helps keep the overall master output volume from jumping too much during those parts.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you found Glenn’s video helpful.

Delta Bluesy Drone Licks Lesson

Guitar World has posted another video lesson from Andy Aledort. In this lesson, he’s looking at how to emulate the open-tuning sound of the old delta blues masters on standard tuning.

This video is helpful if you’re looking to improve your understanding of what makes the delta blues sound work, or if you want some tips on how to improvise around this concept.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you enjoyed Andy’s video.

Studying David Gilmour’s String Bends

David Gilmour’s lead phrasing is amongst the most iconic ever recorded, instantly recognisable whenever we hear it. But just what is he doing? Paul Davids shows us.

Be warned: this video features extreme 5 semi-tone string bends. Just watching Paul’s fingers getting caught under the strings made me wince!

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you enjoyed Paul’s video. Or even if you just felt sorry for his poor abused fingers.

Behind The Scenes – Making Backing Tracks

Shane has been making new backing tracks for his YouTube channel, and he’s shot a video showing how he does it.

He’s got a pretty slick and efficient way of putting these together, and a very firm opinion of what to do for drums in a track (plus recommendations for where to get great drums from). You’ll have to watch the video to see how he does it 🙂

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you enjoyed Shane’s video.

Mary Spender Breaks Down ‘Only One’

For this week’s Tuesday Talk, Mary Spender walks us through the history and recording of her new song ‘Only One’.

This is the first song where Mary has done all the engineering herself. She normally records in a studio, but this time she wanted to have more time to work on the song – and studio time quickly becomes very expensive.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment. It takes a lot of courage to share this kind of information, especially in today’s world of armchair critics and trolls.

How To Sound Like A Gear Demo

Brian Wampler has posted a great video, walking us all through his exact recording process for the amps and pedals in his videos.

It’s incredibly generous of Brian to share this with us. For many YouTubers and professional musicians, recorded sound quality is a competitive advantage – and teaching these techniques is a source of income too.

Please head over to YouTube to leave a like and a supportive comment if you found Brian’s video useful.