Initial Thoughts On The Marshall Studio Amps vs Marshall Origin For Pedals

At Winter NAMM 2019, Marshall made a major announcement: they launched not one, but two 20W amps based on classic designs. The Marshall Studio Vintage 20 is based on the famed plexi-era amps, and the Studio Classic 20 is based on the JCM 800 – the amp of 80’s rock.

And, by all accounts, both of these amps absolutely nail those tones.

Where does this leave last year’s big new amp, the Marshall Origin? Will the Origin finally find its audience, or is it going to disappear?

The Marshall Origin Isn’t A Plexi

When the Marshall Origin launched, everyone was hoping for Marshall plexi-era tones on a budget. They wanted that Marshall dirt tone from their amp, not from pedals. They didn’t get that. And the Origin’s reputation has (unfairly, I think) suffered ever since.

Personally, I think Marshall’s just as much to blame as anyone. In their initial marketing and demos, they got carried away with trying to pitch the Origin at the plexi-on-a-budget crowd. They set this amp up to disappoint. It’s no wonder it has.

Somewhere along the way – maybe due to all the delays – the message got lost, and by the time this amp was out, just about the only place talking about this amp as a pedal platform was Marshall’s own website. And in the 10 months since the amp started shipping, nothing’s happened to correct public perception.

It’s a shame, because the Origin might just be the best pedal platform in Marshall’s line-up today.

The Marshall Origin Is For Pedals

The Origin is a great amp if you like both vintage tones and dirt from pedals.

I always describe it as an opinionated amp. It colours everything you run through it, in a way I’ve not found with clean channels on other amps. The results are fantastic, but there’s a limit to how radically you can change the tone just by changing pedals. The Origin’s colour is always going to be part of the final tone.

That might sound like a negative. But, if I look at my pedal shelf, there isn’t a single drive pedal on there that doesn’t sound great through the Origin.

Although it’s a dead-clean amp, with an insane amount of input headroom, the Origin somehow sounds like it is on the edge of break-up. How many pedal demos has Pete Thorn done where he’s set his amps up on the edge of break-up to get the best out of the pedal?

It’s a thing many pedals are designed for, and it’s what the Origin utterly nails.

Other Marshall Amps? Not In The Same Way

If we switch out the Origin for a JCM 800, one of two things emerge.

Some pedals just lack life unless they’re running through an amp on the edge of break-up. With the JCM 800 set on the edge of break-up, those pedals will sound very similar to how they would sound through an Origin. There are differences – and they may well be important to you. If they’re not, the Origin’s much better value for money than the new Studio Classic, the JCM 800 in a 20W format.

(The 80’s thing was to crank a JCM 800 and use pedals like the Boss SD-1 and DS-1 as boosts to push it over the edge. You’ve heard that sound on untold classic rock albums of that era.)

The other thing you might find is that some pedals are voiced for Fender blackface-style clean channels. I find this is especially true with older boutique pedals from USA-based pedal makers. The signature mid-focused Marshall sound can make it difficult to dial these pedals in. To my ears, they often end up sounding harsh, or nasally, or too bright and brittle. Sometimes, those tones can work in a mix. If you’re just noodling at home (we’re the HomeToneBlog, not the OneHundredThousandSeaterVenueToneBlog!) not so much.

Don’t get me wrong – the Origin sounds like a Marshall. It’s just got more of its energy in the upper-mids in a way other Marshalls don’t (which is why it sounds too bright and harsh to many ears), and that difference – that shift – is just enough to make it work well with Fender-voiced pedals.

And even actual Fender pedals sound amazing through the Origin. Two of my favourite pedals through the Origin are Fender’s Santa Ana Overdrive and The Pelt fuzz.

Conclusions So Far

If you want classic Marshall amp rock tones, go and try the new Studio Vintage (for plexi-type tones) and Studio Classic (for the JCM 800 thing). They’re already shipping, and new owners seem delighted with how they sound.

If pedals are more your thing, then don’t overlook the Marshall Origin just because people have been disappointed with it. They hoped the Origin was a plexi-on-a-budget. Of course they were disappointed.

Will I Buy A Studio Vintage or Studio Classic Amp?

I’ve already got amps that cover the same territory – the Metro Plex, Plexi and 800 pre-amp modules for my Synergy rig. So I probably won’t. These Marshall amps simply came out too late for me.

But you can be damn sure I’m going to go and try them out when they’re in stock locally. Who doesn’t love a Marshall?

Speaking of Synergy … if you want both of these new Marshall amps, it might make more sense to buy the Synergy equivalents instead.

At the time of writing, the Studio Vintage 20H and Studio Classic 20H will together cost you £1724. You can buy a Synergy 30w head, Plexi module and 800 module for £1909. That’s £185 pounds more.

If you go down the Synergy route, you also get a dedicated clean channel built into the 30w head, giving you a two-channel amplifier. (The new Marshall’s are all single-channel amps) And you can add completely new amps for less than the cost an Origin 20H, by buying additional modules when you’re ready.

We’re living in a golden age of tone choices right now, whichever way you want to go.

On My Wishlist: Blackstar’s Studio 10 6L6

Earlier today, I popped round my local guitar shop to try Blackstar’s new Studio 10 combo amps. I came away with the 6L6 version firmly on my list of amps to buy.

Why Are You Looking For A New Amp?

I love my Marshall Origin 20H. In the 10 months or so that I’ve had it, it’s become my everyday amp at home. It’s been a much better pedal platform than I could have hoped for. Even now, I’m still learning how to get new tones out of it. Without a doubt, it’s been one of the best purchases I’ve ever made when it comes to guitar gear.

If there’s one ‘but’ when it comes to the Origin, it’s that the Origin’s strong personality can always be heard, no matter the pedal used. The Origin is middy, with a strong emphasis on the upper mids. Sometimes, I just feel like a change. Sometimes, I just want a break from the Origin.

Maybe it’s because I grew up playing Strat knockoffs, I don’t know. There’s just something about 6L6 / blackface-voiced amps that always draws me back to that sound. Especially when playing cleaner tones with a Strat.

And with rehearsals well underway for our first acoustic gig, I’m playing a lot of clean stuff atm.

That Sounds Like You Want A Fender Amp?

Fender doesn’t really play in this space atm.

Their high-end amps like the Deluxe Reverb Re-issue (DRRI) are lush. They’re also big, heavy, and expensive. I haven’t really found anything in their lineup that brings that beautiful blackface clean tone to home players on a budget.

So it’s no wonder that other manufacturers are looking to fill the gap in the market that Fender’s left for them.

Enter Blackstar Studio 10

New for 2019, Blackstar has launched 3 new 12” combos: Studio 10 EL34, Studio 10 KT88 and Studio 10 6L6. As the names suggest, each is focused on bringing a specific kind of tone to home and home studio players, in a 10 watt format.

I can’t comment on the Studio 10 KT88 at all, as I’ve not played one yet. When they turn up in the shops, I will go and check them out.

My local shop did have both the Studio 10 EL34 and Studio 10 6L6 in stock. I spent the best part of an hour playing through both with a couple of the new American Performer Strats and Fender’s The Pelt Fuzz pedal. I love that pedal so much!

What Was The Studio 10 EL34 Like?

It sounded good.

It’s got that mid-push EL34 thing going on. Clean, the tones from the Strat were cutting, with good clarity. The kind of clean tones that would work really well in a mix.

With The Pelt, the mid-focus was really apparent. There isn’t a lot of bottom end / extended range on tap. I couldn’t find any warm tones in the amp. It struck me very much as an amp to rock out on, without the excessive brightness of Marshall Origin combos.

I’ve already got the Origin 20H. If I didn’t, then the Studio 10 EL34 would probably be on my wishlist.

What Was The Studio 10 6L6 Like?

Mmm. There it is. That lush blackface clean tone that I’ve been looking for.

This amp has both the extended range and mid-scoop that I remember from the last time I played a DRRI. Clean sounds have that piano-like ring that I want, and The Pelt was warm and chewy.

If anything, sat next to it, the amp was a little boomy. There’s a single tone control, but that’s more for matching the amp to your guitar. You might need to budget for an EQ pedal in the FX loop if you find the amp a little boomy too.

I had no trouble at all imagining this amp sat in my office all day as an alternative to my Marshall Origin. And that’s exactly what’s going to happen come pay day.

Did You Mention The American Performer Strat?

Yes, I did.

I tried both the maple and rosewood fretboard versions, and they both were great to play. I’ll talk more about them at pay day, when at least one of them is coming home with me.